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  • The long drought in California is, of course, bad news for most in the agriculture business — but winemakers are seeing some real benefits. The lack of rain is actually leading to some of the best wine Napa and Sonoma counties have seen in a while:ess water means smaller grapes, and that concentrates the flavor, notes a vineyard president. Then there's the fact that a lot of rain can mean moldy grapes. On top of that, the sun is making grapes riper earlier, and that allows a harvest before the threat of autumn storms.
  • The traditional fire season has only just begun, and already in California firefighters have battled at least 1,000 more wildfires than in a typical year. So far this year, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection has sent crews to nearly 5,000 wildfires, which have charred a combined 92,139 acres on non-U.S. Forest Service land, according to a statewide fire activity update issued this week.
  • Tropical Storm Norbert, the fourteenth named storm of a busy eastern Pacific hurricane season, is on its way to becoming a hurricane.Norbert's wind shear, or change in winds with height, appears to be lessening. With a moist atmosphere and warm sea-surface temperatures, Norbert should intensify to a hurricane within the next 24 hours, or less. In fact, the National Hurricane Center says rapid intensification is a possibility, if shear relaxes sufficiently.
  • At 3:19 a.m. Sunday, Napa Valley was still its placid self, the leafy wine capital of America. Silent but for a few night owls, its upscale stores sat locked, the usual weekend rush of tourists still hours away.That all transformed in less time than it takes to pull a cork.Six miles away and nearly 7 miles beneath the Earth's surface, one of the area's spiderwebs of earthquake faults woke with a 6.0-magnitude fury at 3:20 a.m. - and when the local shaking stopped about five seconds later, a different Napa emerged.
  • Wildfires burning near Northern California vineyards and in the Yosemite National Park area were threatening hundreds of homes even as crews worked to contain them.A wildfire in northern California is threatening more than 500 homes this morning.The Sand Fire in the Sierra Nevada foothills east of Sacramento was 50 percent surrounded as of late Sunday, after burning 13 homes and 38 outbuildings. It has scorched roughly six square miles of rugged grassland and timber near wine-growing regions in Amador and El Dorado Counties.
  • More records were broken on Thursday across the central and southern portions of the United States as autumn like air maintained its grip on the eastern half of the country. More temperature records are likely to fall on Friday from the southern Plains to the Southeast with daytime temperatures not rising out of the 70s.
  • Though he left downed trees and power outages in his wake, Arthur is no longer classified as a hurricane.Downgraded to a post-tropical storm early Saturday, Arthur's powerful winds and heavy rain moved into southeastern Canada. They pelted the Canadian Maritime provinces after skidding by North Carolina on Friday, without causing major damage. Weakening as it churned its way up the coast, the storm hit Nova Scotia on Saturday, halting play for the day at a major golfing event. By midday Saturday, Arthur was centered about 95 miles west-northwest of Halifax, Nova Scotia, according to the U.S. National Hurricane Center.
  • Recent crop reports by the U.S. Department of Agriculture said rain has taken a toll on Wisconsin's farms. A report on Monday said 3.2 days were suitable for field work across the state in the previous week. In the week before that, only 1.8 days were suitable. The main culprit in both reports was saturated soil. For example, the 16.7 inches of rain that fell in Appleton from April to June is 6.5 inches more than normal, the National Weather Service said.
  • East Coasters, if intense rains and strong winds ruin your Fourth of July holiday, you will have Arthur to blame.That's the name of the first named storm of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season. Arthur is now churning off the coast of eastern Florida.
  • The two-fisted storm that pummeled the Chicago area this week has been classified as a rare double derecho: Two waves of destructive winds that swept across a swath of the Midwest from central Iowa to Ohio. The first derecho formed around 2 p.m. Monday in Iowa and sped across northwest Illinois into Wisconsin over the next five hours, packing winds of more than 55 mph, according to the National Weather Servic
  • Not only is this season’s cherry crop huge, but the individual cherries you pop in your mouth are larger, juicier and sweeter, too. Think “jumbo,” say growers.“Cherries from the Pacific Northwest are sizing larger than years past,” said Steve Lutz, vice president of marketing for Wenatchee-based Columbia Marketing International (CMI), one of the state’s largest fruit growers and shippers. “And sugar levels are at the top of the charts.” The bulk of the season’s dark sweet cherries are running one to two sizes larger than normal, Lutz said. That’s because spring weather ideal for cherries and a nicely spread tree bloom that gave cherries room to grow have combined this year, he said, “to produce exceptional fruit.”
  • Alaska had its eighth warmest winter and its second warmest first five months of a year since record keeping began nearly a century ago, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported in its monthly climate review, release on June 19.
  • In Ohio, as of May 25, 69 percent of corn was planted, compared with 87 percent at this time last year and a 74 percent five-year average, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service
  • Weather officials in Albuquerque say a mysterious presence that showed up on its radar the last few nights has turned out to be of the insect variety. The National Weather Service says a swarm of grasshoppers were detected over Albuquerque's West Mesa for the fourth night in a row on Friday. Meteorologist Chuck Jones says the swarm got caught up in winds heading southwest and is being carried as high as 1,000 feet. Jones says the grasshoppers likely hatched weeks ago and are now grown, leading to their ability to trigger radar images.
  • The first hurricane of the eastern Pacific season formed hundreds of miles off Mexico's mainland coast Saturday and could become a major storm by Sunday though it poses no immediate threat to land, forecasters in Miami said.
  • There is still no sign of three men who disappeared after a massive mudslide hit near the Western Slope town of Collbran, on the Grand Mesa, following heavy rain. The three men went to the area to check on their irrigation water that had been disrupted.
  • Formosan termites are swarming throughout the New Orleans area on Thursday night (May 22), as a combination of meteorological conditions provided just the right conditions for the winged, reproductive version of the insect to leave their nests. Hundreds of termites were flittering around light poles in the French Quarter, and were reported flying at Zephyrs Field where an AAA baseball game was underway. The reproductive version of the insect, called alates, leaves nests in trees and buildings when temperatures are above 80 degrees, there is relatively high humidity conditions at and just after dusk, and wind speeds drop to zero to just 5 mph.
  • The severe and historic drought underway in California is expected to take a large financial bite out of the Golden State's agricultural sector -- and lead to thousands of jobs being cut. It's also projected to have additional impacts on the nation's food prices.A new study by the University of California, Davis' Center for Watershed Sciences says the state's ongoing dry conditions will deal a "severe blow" to irrigated agriculture and farm communities in California's Central Valley -- one of the most productive agricultural regions on earth -- while costing the state around $1.7 billion.
  • This week's unseasonably early wildfires have driven tens of thousands from their homes and shut down schools and amusement parks, including Legoland, which reopened Thursday. Flames have charred more than 15 square miles and caused more than $20 million in damage, burning at least eight houses, an 18-unit apartment complex and two businesses. Firefighters found a badly burned body Thursday in a transient camp in Carlsbad — the first apparent fatality — and a Camp Pendleton Fire Department firefighter was treated for heat exhaustion while battling a square-mile blaze on the Marine base.
  • An early spring melt-off has left much of Southwest Alaska primed for wildfires much earlier than usual. “Right now we’re basically calling it ‘snow-free,’” said Assistant Fire Management Officer Hans Smith, who’s based with the forestry department in McGrath. “We did a couple of flights last week out of the western area, from Iliamna down, from Crooked Creek down. It’s been hot and dry since then, so what little snow remained has probably melted off.” If so, that’s about two weeks earlier than an average year, according to Smith. Because this year’s minimal snowpack has melted away sooner than the start of green-up, fuels like grasses and even trees are drying out significantly, increasing the potential for fires.
  • Large schools of baitfish off the coast of Point Reyes, presenting a feast for birds and sea mammals and a strange sight for locals last month, may have been lured north and inland because of warmer ocean temperatures this year. A fisheries scientist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said it was too early to tell if the oceanographic conditions might indicate a coming El Niño, since those conditions can be highly variable from year to year; however, last month NOAA reported that the chances of an El Niño event kicking off by this summer exceed 50 percent.An avian ecologist with Petaluma-based Point Blue said that “off the charts” numbers of pelicans in the area last month might also point to abnormal ocean conditions and a coming El Niño event.
  • In the latest blow from a days-long chain of severe weather across the South and Midwest, the Florida Panhandle and Alabama Gulf Coast were hit with widespread flooding early Wednesday, with Interstate 10 closed for several hours at the Alabama-Florida state line, people stranded in cars and homes waiting for rescuers to find a way around impassable roads, and others abandoning vehicles to walk to safety. I-10 reopened shortly after 8 a.m. Baldwin County, Ala., Emergency Management Agency Director Mitchell Sims told AL.com early Wednesday that "we have historical flooding" throughout the county and the calls for help have been "non-stop" all night.
  • Emergency workers are searching through rubble left in the wake of a series of deadly tornadoes and severe weather, the worst of which hit suburban Little Rock, Ark., Sunday night. One tornado touched down around 7 p.m. west of Little Rock and grew to be half a mile wide, authorities said. It was among a rash of tornadoes and heavy storms that rumbled across the center and south of the country overnight. The National Weather Service forecast that destructive storms could again strike Monday in the South and Mississippi Valley.
  • Last month, consumer prices were bumped up by the second consecutive 0.4 percent rise in food prices. A drought in the western United States has pushed up prices for meat, dairy, fruit and vegetables.
  • Recently, the Norman Office announced on twitter that it had been a record amount of time since a confirmed tornado had touched down in its CWA and also a record amount of time since the office had issued a TORNADO WARNING. Both streaks of time without activity came to an end on Sunday and in the style of the recent past the announcement of the end of that time period came on Twitter. On Sunday a brief tornado was caught on camera from a KWTV chopper that was flying over Stephens County.
  • Topsoil blew into a dark cloud that swept across the flat landscape of southeast Colorado once again Monday afternoon. Footsteps leave dust in loose pockets and grit in the teeth of those who speak. The land pays a bigger price. After nearly four years of deep drought, wind-churned dust has become a slow-moving natural disaster. Comparisons to the Dust Bowl are no longer hyperbole — they're accurate.
  • Rescuers scoured a Mississippi neighborhood on Monday for a 9-year-old who appeared to be swept away by flood waters the night before, while floods in Alabama stranded people in cars and homes in a turbulent morning across the American South.
  • With the weather predicted to warm up this week, plant experts say they may finally be in for a treat: a simultaneous burst of color, as flowering species that normally bloom in succession instead paint the landscape pink, yellow and white all at once.
  • The National Weather Service in New Orleans has issued a flash flood warning for Orleans Parish and St. Bernard Parish in southeast Louisiana until noon CDT. This includes the city of New Orleans. At 10:26 a.m. CDT...National Weather Service meteorologists detected very heavy rain from thunderstorms over Orleans and northern St. Bernard parishes. Locations in the warning include but are not limited to Lakefront Airport and the city of New Orleans.
  • The feel of winter is going to carry over into the first week of spring if you live east of the Rockies. Not only are temperatures going to plunge below average, but we also expect a powerful storm to develop just off the East Coast, bringing the potential for a nasty winter storm for parts of the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic.
  • Severe drought persists across many states and, looking ahead, the arid conditions will likely remain or grow even worse.That's the bleak assessment from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center, which has released its outlook for this spring. This CPC map shows in brown where forecasters see drought either persisting or intensifying. Areas drawn in tan represent a slight improvement in drought, whereas olive green means great improvement and yellow is where new droughts could develop.
  • The massive mudslide that wiped out part of a town in rural northwestern Washington Saturday struck so quickly that residents couldn't escape its path, scientists said, leading to the deaths of at least 25 people, with scores still unaccounted for. And, they said, the slide's large size—which covered nearly a square mile (2.6 square kilometers) with mud and debris—is likely to hamper efforts to clean up the area and rebuild.
  • High winds are to blame for a shockingly large amount of tumbleweeds that have blown into a neighborhood south of Colorado Springs. The tumbleweeds piled up in front of homes in a new development in the town of Fountain, and the piles that covered the road and cars were are as high as 10 feet in some places.
  • Impressively, it’s the third biggest snowstorm on record to occur so late in the season in Washington weather records, which date back to 1888.The only more prolific snow-producers this deep into March occurred March 28-29, 1942 (11.5 inches), and March 27-28, 1891 (12 inches).
  • Seismologists say Monday's magnitude 4.4 temblor near Westwood could mark the beginning of the end for L.A.'s years-long "earthquake drought."Typically, they would expect a 4.4-sized earthquake about once a year in the Los Angeles Basin, but that hasn't happened for years. “We don’t know if this is the end of the earthquake drought we’ve had over the last few years, and we won’t know for many months,” said Caltech seismologist Egill Hauksson.
  • You’ll get summer, spring and winter this week, wrapped up in a few days’ worth of weather. And you can thank a winter weather pattern that has been anything but consistent.
  • Chicagoans shed their hats and gloves as they came outside to enjoy spring-like weather -- but it won't last long. On Monday, the temperatures hit 56-degrees. By Tuesday, a double digit drop to 42-degrees and snow. This has been one of the area's harshest winters on the books. The thaw and freeze cycle has led to thousands of potholes. The continuing cold could also delay area farmers from planting their crops. Planting time is a month away, but the cold is already impacting operations at Dave Kesto's farm. "I've got a ton of seeds in the shed I need to haul out. In a normal year, I would have been moving that seed already," Kesto said. Kesto said they need warmer, drier weather to get the seeds in the ground. It could be months before farmers can tell how the weather impacted their crops.
  • A new report from NOAA's Climate Prediction Center suggests changes could be on the way for weather patterns across the U.S. and the globe. According to the report, the chance of an El Niño reemerging this year has increased. And, if the models from the report play out, that could mean fewer named storms in the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season and potential drought relief for parts of California later this year. An El Niño cycle can occur every two to seven years, when weaker trade winds allow warmer water around the equator in the far eastern Pacific Ocean to emerge. That warmer water changes wind patterns and alters storm cycles around the globe.
  • A late-season winter storm spread freezing rain, sleet and snow across the state Sunday night and early Monday, making travel conditions hazardous and leaving thousands of Arkansas without power. Temperatures stayed below freezing in most of the state Monday, but a thaw was expected Tuesday in all but the northeastern corner of the state, the National Weather Service said.Temperatures are expected to rise gradually through the week, according to the weather service. The Arkansas State Police responded to numerous crashes and stranded motorists Sunday and Monday. Bruce Kanki, 35, of Springdale was killed Sunday night when a vehicle he was riding in as a passenger went out of control on a snowy curve and struck a guardrail and a retaining wall on Interstate 540 in Benton County, according to a state police report.
  • Expect bulky, multi-layered Carnival costumes accompanied by rain gear to be de rigueur on Mardi Gras 2014, thanks to a cold and wet forecast for New Orleans, Baton Rouge and the north shore. The chilliest temperatures will be in Baton Rouge and areas north of St. Tammany Parish, where the National Weather Service has posted a freeze warning from 2 a.m. to 8 a.m. Tuesday, with temperatures of 29 to 32 degrees expected to last 2 to 6 hours. There's a chance that Tuesday's high could tie or break the existing record for lowest high temperature for Mar. 4, which was 47, set in 2002.
  • Authorities ordered the evacuation of several communities near L.A. as torrential rains caused mudslides throughout the area. About 32,000 households were hit with power outages and slicked roads caused numerous traffic accidents
  • "Any rain is important, obviously, so we'll take whatever we can get," says Jason Clapp, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Sacramento. He says these storms won't end the state's ongoing drought, but they will bring significant precipitation. "We're still looking for a couple feet of snow at the highest elevations -- through the whole series -- the two storms," says Clapp. "We're still expecting a couple of inches of rain over the mountains and anywhere from half to an inch and a half in the valley, depending on where you're at." Clapp says thunderstorms are possible, especially tomorrow, along with high winds and blowing snow in the Sierra.He says more wet weather may be on the way next week, as well.
  • City dwellers battling one of the most brutal winters on record have been dealing with something far more dangerous than snow falling from the sky: ice tumbling from skyscrapers. Streets around New York's new 1 World Trade Center, the nation's tallest building, were recently closed when sheets of ice were seen shearing from the face of the 1,776-foot structure — turning them into potentially deadly, 100-mph projectiles.
  • One effect of the persistently cold winter of 2013-2014 is showing up on the world's largest group of freshwater lakes. According to an analysis by NOAA's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory, ice covered 78.7 percent of the Great Lakes on February 6. Not since early 1996 has ice been so widespread on the Great Lakes.This is an abrupt turn around from the past four winters, during which the peak ice coverage remained around 40 percent or less. As you can see in the graph below, the 40-year average is just over 51 percent.
  • President Obama is traveling to the Fresno area, Friday, where he’ll take part in a roundtable with those affected by the drought. During his visit, the White House says, Mr. Obama will lay out a laundry list of efforts his administration is taking to help those affected, including:
  • A major winter storm that has caused at least six deaths unfurled across much of the U.S. South on Tuesday, and forecasters warned that ice could cripple road travel and bring widespread power outages in coming days.The storm's combination of rain, sleet, heavy snow and thick ice across the South is of "historical proportions," said the National Weather Service office in Peachtree City, Georgia.
  • Old Man Winter is doing more than driving up heating bills and icing roads in the erstwhile sunny South.He may put a chill on your party plans this spring and summer, by icing over breeding ponds and depressing the appetite of one of the region’s taste delights, the crawfish.
  • The punishing drought that has swept California is now threatening the state’s drinking water supply. With no sign of rain, 17 rural communities providing water to 40,000 people are in danger of running out within 60 to 120 days. State officials said that the number was likely to rise in the months ahead after the State Water Project, the main municipal water distribution system, announced on Friday that it did not have enough water to supplement the dwindling supplies of local agencies that provide water to an additional 25 million people. It is first time the project has turned off its spigot in its 54-year history.
  • A mere few inches of snow had shut down Atlanta, forcing children to spend the night at schools, stranding drivers on interstates and making the city a laughingstock to the country.Why did this happen? Who's to blame?And, more importantly, could this happen elsewhere?Perhaps.
  • The blasts of Arctic air have been relentless so far this month for many cities east of the Rockies. Unfortunately, for many areas January will end before any significant relief can arrive.A new surge of frigid air has now poured southward from Canada behind an Alberta clipper that brought snow and wind to the Upper Midwest this past weekend. Temperatures in some cities may rival what we saw in early January.
  • For Louisiana's large and growing population of hard-core, fanatical duck hunters, this should have been the season they'd talk about. The perfect storm of perfect conditions: daily showers throughout the summer of 2013 freshened coastal marshes, and as a result, the duck ponds grew more grass than the Colorado hydroponics industry. Some ponds were so rich with submerged aquatic vegetation, they looked like they could be mowed. So why no ducks?
  • Southeast Louisiana saw snow touch down for the first time since 2008, when some light flurries started to fall on Thursday (Jan. 23) evening.State police say icy road conditions were a factor in two south Louisiana highway traffic deaths. Icing led authorities to close numerous roads around the state, including the Causeway over Lake Pontchartrain and the elevated portion of Interstate 49 through Alexandria.
  • Numerical weather models tend to become very unreliable beyond 5 or 6 days but meteorologists have discovered a trick that helps in long-range forecasting. At least a bit. We still cannot pin down what day a storm will hit at a particular place but we can get a good idea of whether or not the pattern will be warm/cold/dry or stormy.
  • After one of the quietest U.S. tornado seasons in 40 years, Sunday was nature's comeback, with a total of 81 tornado reports in Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Indiana and Ohio. Illinois was the hardest hit, with 43 tornadoes, followed by 23 in Indiana, 13 in Kentucky, one in Missouri and one in Ohio.
  • Recently on the Almanac, Peter Cullen noticed he hasn't seen many bears in the mountains of New Mexico this year. Bears are foragers, and Cullen says the lack of piñon, oak and juniper trees caused them to head down to mountain towns looking for thrown-away leftovers.That got us thinking about our bear populations here in western Colorado....
  • Dallas and June Harding are regulars on the Almanac, but most of their daily weather observations you'll see there date back to the late 1980s. That's because those entries were transcribed from the journals June started keeping in 1985, when she and Dallas moved to their current home at the Harding Ranch near the base of Coal Mountain.
  • As Metro New Orleans prepares for Tropical Storm Karen, meteorologists and climatologists have been wondering why the 2013 Hurricane Season has had so many tropical storms, but so few hurricanes. It could be a landmark year for understanding hurricane formation, but the government shut down means there's fewer eyes able to keep close tabs on the climate data.
  • After historic rains and flooding devastated the Front Range, western Colorado recently got its own brief taste of storms. Along with those rains came the exciting sight of the season’s first snow on the mountains. Are we in for a wet winter?
  • I noticed the clouds hanging over the mountain passes on I-70, driving back from Denver Monday morning.Four days later, those clouds let loose historic amounts of rainfall over the Front Range, devastating the area with the worst flooding the state’s ever seen. Records were broken, and the storm rekindled rough memories of the 1976 Big Thompson Flood.
  • Four days of rainfall across Colorado’s Front Range produced massive flooding that’s marooned thousands of people, inundated many key roads, and damaged countless homes and businesses. Just how rare was this event? Was it a 100-year flood, or something bigger (or smaller)?
  • A storm that dumped more than seven inches of rain over the north and central Colorado Thursday, killing at least three people.
  • In late July, a massive dust storm in the Saharan Desert of Africa moved across the Atlantic, making for an interesting start to the hurricane season, or you could say a boring one.All that dust in the air essentially acted like a shield, fending off the sun and keeping the ocean cooler, which in turn has kept tropical storms from growing into hurricanes. Though that’s probably good news to people along the Gulf Coast, dust storms at their origins can be severely destructive. Southeastern Coloradans have been learning that lesson the hard way recently...
  • Last week the Almanac saw a lot of talk about mushrooms. KVNF's Travis Bubenik sits down with wild mushroom "guru", Ryan Warwick, and talks about rain, thunderstorms, and shroom dynamics in your backayard!
  • iSeeChanger, Megan Hines said apples seemed to be ripe earlier than usual in Wisconsin. With fruit season approaching in western Colorado, KVNF's Travis Bubenik zooms out a bit and looks at how Colorado’s biggest fruit crop fits into the national scene.
  • On iSeeChange at the Almanac last week, Patty Kaech-Feder noticed some Aspen trees along Kebler Pass had already started turning yellow. KVNF's Travis Bubenik talks to Stanford University's William Anderegg about aspen tree health and modeling the future of climate change that is "happening right now."
  • It's a critical time for crops across the country. KVNF's Travis Bubenik looks into questions from iSeeChangers Mathew Harris in Paonia wondering about too little rain in the North Fork Valley and Angela Davis in Florida wondering about too much rain!
  • On the Almanac last week, P Kaech reported seeing snow on the top of Mt. Baldy near Crested Butte, and Andrea Lecos noticed that monsoon rains have brought up mosquitoes and other insects. Humans may hate the bugs, but birds are feasting on them. KVNF's Marty Durlin spoke with Jason Beason of the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory about breeding season along the North Fork of the Gunnison River.
  • The Monsoon season has arrived in Colorado, the annual time when hot, high pressure in the atmosphere moves east across the Continental Divide and cool, moist air comes trailing in behind it. It's a reliable weather pattern, but exactly how reliable? KVNF's Travis Bubenik reports.
  • For this week’s iSeeChange Cast, KVNF's Travis Bubenik looks into the multiple ways that ditch lining projects may be changing the local ecology.
  • Unfortunately, this year it didn’t matter how frost-hearty the cherries and apricots were—nothing could save them from the brutal cold snap that hit on April 8, right when the buds were at their most vulnerable stage. Not a single farmer that we spoke with from the valley to the mesa was able to save their cherry crop this year, no matter how many old-timer or new-fangled techniques they tried.
  • Last week, Don Wally and Pkaech reported seeing the summer's first sunflowers. They wondered if the flowers were blooming faster and earlier than usual. Turns out University of Maryland Biology Professor David Inouye is seeing the same thing. For iSeeChange and KVNF, Travis Bubenik reports.
  • West Fork Fire Complex Grows to 83,000 Acres; Rain Predicted for Weekend Forest Ecologist Claims Beetles Aren’t to Blame for West Fork Fire KVNF Speaks to Cyclists in Paonia for 19th Annual Colorado Bike Tour
  • The consensus on iSeeChange last week was…it’s hot! Too hot for this time of year. Too hot and too dry. If climate change experts are right, this will only get worse. KVNF’s Marty Durlin spoke to Dave Kanzer, senior water resources engineer for the Colorado River Conservation District, about the effects of a hotter, dryer world.
  • The deadly Black Canyon wildfire, which started Tuesday, continues to ravage Colorado Springs. It has destroyed 473 homes and damaged 17 – making it the most destructive fire in Colorado's history. The blaze has killed two people and burned 15,500 acres. More than 34,000 homes have been evacuated.
  • iSeeChange: Dustbowl Daze in Southeastern Colorado
  • Western Slope Mines must Clean-Up Oxbow Mine Still Dealing with Spontaneous Combustion San Diego Meeting To Focus on Colorado River Shortages Colorado Moose Increasing as Herds Decline Elsewhere
  • Nearly 500 species of birds make their way through Colorado or live here year-around – and chances are local birder and author Evelyn Horn knows them. In the second report of a two-part series, KVNF’s Marty Durlin talked to Horn about the general decline of birds in a world where human population and activity is on the rise.
  • May 11 was Colorado’s Migratory Bird Day, celebrating the nearly 500 species that live in the state or pass through it. KVNF's Marty Durlin talks to local naturalist Evelyn Horn, who's spent the past twenty years or so watching birds on the Western Slope.
  • Parks & Wildlife increasing bear hunting licenses in response to dangerously high numbers of black bears in the state iSeeChange: history unfolds with the story of twin orchardists in the North Fork
  • Greeley Town Council okays 16 gas wells despite opposition from citizens Bears wake up, wander into Telluride
  • Rock slide closes McClure Pass at Paonia Reservoir Carrots, tulips, cherries, kestrals, the First Red Flag Warning and other signs of spring
  • Parachute Creek hydrocarbon leak containment efforts continue Avalanche Center report on Loveland slide suggests human error iSeeChange: What IS a normal spring?
  • Thanks to consistent spring snowfall, Colorado resorts Copper Mountain, Aspen Highlands, Vail and Breckenridge will extend their seasons. Aspen/Snowmass received a whopping 32 inches of new snow since April 9, including a 17 inch total for the past 48 hours.
  • Paonia resident Amber Kleinman has been reading through the daily journals of William Beezley, an orchardist and farmer who documented change in the North Fork Valley during the Dust Bowl era and through the first half of the 20th century. Recording selected entries for thealmanac.org and comparing them to current weather and conditions, Kleinman – a small-acreage farmer who keeps a journal herself -- has gained a new perspective.
  • KVNF's Marty Durlin reports on ranchers turning to less conventional feed sources to keep their cattle fed through the drought.
  • Unfortunately, this year it didn’t matter how frost-hearty the cherries and apricots were—nothing could save them from the brutal cold snap that hit on April 8, right when the buds were at their most vulnerable stage. Not a single farmer that we spoke with from the valley to the mesa was able to save their cherry crop this year, no matter how many old-timer or new-fangled techniques they tried.
  • March left the western Colorado high country snowpack in better shape than the same month had a year ago, but that’s not the same as saying that the moisture stored among the peaks will easily recharge reservoirs and flood fields.
  • Pipeline Leak Reveals Holes In Regulatory System Threat of Colony Collapse Coming to a Beehive Near You Crane Count: 750 last night; 11,000 so far
  • This year, as reported on iSeeChange, mosquitoes are already coming out, presenting challenges for everyone. KVNF's Marty Durlin reports on decisions facing the North Fork Mosquito Abatement Board.
  • Friday brought the first major wildfire of the 2013 season in Colorado. The Galena Fire was reported at 11:46 a.m. and by the evening burned over 700 acres near Fort Collins.
  • Water managers care only about the snow-water equivalent – what snow hydrologist Mark Rikkers calls the “snow bank.” How much water is up in the high country that can be counted on to flow into rivers, irrigate crops, fill reservoirs and recharge watersheds?
  • BLM Must Tell Who Nominated NF Valley For Leasing By April 15th ATV Activists Protest To Maintain Access To Public Lands Sandhill Cranes In Delta County Find New Staging Area
  • "As long as anyone can remember, thousands of migrating Sandhill Cranes have staged overnight during their northward migration around Fruitgrowers Resevoir in Hart's Basin in Delta County Colorado. The annual Crane Days festival should have been held in Eckert in early March but there weren't enough cranes coming through the Basin. I recently learned that the crane migration is actually right on schedule but the birds are staging at a new location west of Delta, at the Escalante State Wildlife Area."
  • Snowpack and Reservoirs Lower Than Last Year Forest Service Seeks Comments On Ski Area Water Policy
  • Bears In-Town Forays Higher Than Ever Last Year iSeeChange Update: Biking Season on Jumbo Mountain Extended
  • Forest report reveals damage by spruce beetles Miners back to work at Elk Creek in Somerset $895 million price tag to clean uranium tailings from Arkansas River Controlled burns planned for some 12,000 acres on Western Slope Increased ozone linked to oil and gas drilling in Eastern Utah
  • Lawsuit makes BLM disclose identities of lease buyers Lawmakers debate fracking regs, Gov. Hickenlooper under fire for political stunt Well near Windsor spills 84,000 gallons of fracking fluid Western Slope Skies
  • McClure Pass Wreck Sends Three To Hospital Fire and Drought Depress Rafting Visits in 2012
  • Another Skier Death At Aspen State Snowpack Less Than Last Year People Respond To BLM Deferral of NF Gas Leases Oxbow's Elk Creek Mine To Re-open Grant Will Improve Paonia River Park
  • Elk Creek Mine working on cleanup, still weeks away from opening Environmental groups challenge roadless rule in appeals court Governor Hickenlooper issues new wildfire prevention orders
  • Paonia Mayor discusses BLM meeting at Town Hall Coal projected to become top energy provider by 2030 Elk Creek Mine in Somerset still closed Minor earthquake felt on Western Slope Snowmobile fatality near Overland Reservoir
  • Drought conditions throughout Colorado continue to get worse. Right now more than half the state is under extreme drought. Climatologists and water resource experts are warning that there is very little chance the coming months will be anything resembling normal.
  • Cold temperatures have broken almost 20 weather records on the Western Slope. Temperature readings from Rangely to Crested Butte were the coldest they’ve been in decades, and in some cases, a century. If it feels like the Arctic, there's a reason...
  • Work halted at Oxbow's Elk Creek Mine due to high levels of Carbon Monoxide No ruling yet on Pinon Ridge Uranium Mill in Montrose County Avalanche Fatality in high country near Marble Commissioners set hunting regulations for 2013 season
  • Oil and Gas Commission to study effects of fracking emissions USDA declares drought disaster areas in 14 states iSeeChange examines role of microorganisms in water conservation
  • City of Aspen contemplating future dams/reservoirs on Castle and Maroon creeks.
  • Avalanche Claims Ski Patroller At Snowmass Rout County Snowmobilers Lost, Found, Not Found Despite Snow, Drought Outlook Uncertain Norwood To Ring In The New Year With Fireworks Extravaganza
  • Business is booming at cattle sales yards throughout Colorado – but that’s not so good for ranchers. .KVNF's Ariana Brocious reports on local ranchers struggling with ongoing drought.
  • More high winds expected at Fern Lake fire site, burning since October 2nd in Rocky Mountain National Park, on Sunday night.
  • Fire north of Cortez said to be growing rapidly.
  • @Cassandra Shenk was right! Squirrels have invaded the Colorado Western Slope. Check out the iSeeChange Animal Show to hear more from researcher Caitlin Wells!
  • About two miles from the summit of Mount Evans, a peak that rises above the Denver skyline, a funnel-shaped cloud touched down at just under 12,000 feet.
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